Polish Word WednesMonday 5

A weekly service where I teach you some Polish.*

chleb–[hlehbnoun; bread, one of the four food groups along with cheese, ketchup, and salt

Example Sentence: Stephanie was so desperate for bread she practiced saying chelb until she was blue in the face.

Notes: When we were preparing to move to Poland, I read a guide book to get a little background. I may have skimmed some sections, and I sometimes only remember part of a fact but share it anyway. And that’s how I talked my parents into buying this cheese which I told them was traditional bread from the mountain region of Poland. It was not good. It seems you are supposed to fry it and serve it with a sauce.

Tell me that brown stuff doesn’t look like bread.

And now, for your viewing pleasure, a video:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMCYkhfP_ko]

What words or phrases are you dying to see me explain? Let me know, and you just may see your word in my words next week.

*Be advised that I know less Polish than just about everyone. Please do not use my lessons to actually speak Polish.

Polish Word Wednesday 4

A weekly service where I teach you some Polish.*

książka–[kshonshkahnoun; book

Example Sentence: Stephanie was so silly; she hoped she would know enough Polish at the end of two years to read a książka, a book in Polish. She probably can if it’s a children’s book about counting and goes no higher than 19.

Notes: I cannot stop looking at bookstores here even though not much is in English. I occasionally find a magazine I am interested in, like Redbook or Ladies’ Home Journal. I like this British magazine called Red, and could buy British Vogue if I cared about dressing up for my days of sitting in the apartment. There is a large bookstore chain that usually has one small section of books in English. For some reason, they love Harlan Coben and have all the Sookie Stackhouse novels available. They also seem down with translating Terry Pratchett, which seems an odd choice.

And now, for your viewing pleasure, a video:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Twyvyg37nYY&feature=youtu.be]

What words or phrases are you dying to see me explain? Let me know, and you just may see your word in my words next week.

*Be advised that I know less Polish than just about everyone. Please do not use my lessons to actually speak Polish.

Polish Word Wednesday 3

A weekly service where I teach you some Polish.*

Wszystkich ŚwiętychPronunciation? Type it in Google Translate and take a listen. Then completely understand why my Polish teacher occasionally giggles at my pronunciation; All Saints’ Day, November 1st

Example Sentence: Since Thursday is Wszystkich Świętych, Stephanie made sure to buy milk Wednesday.

Notes: This holiday is a time to remember the deceased. Families decorate the graves of family members with flowers and candles. Graves long forgotten or abandoned are also cleaned and adorned with flowers. All Saints’ Day is a national holiday in Poland, and, as such, is a day off work. This also means stores and restaurants are closed. I learned about national holidays the hard way when I had to drive to five gas stations to scrounge milk one day.

The grocery store was busy today with people stocking up on flowers and candles.

These are some of the candles people use for All Saints’ Day. They come in many sizes and colors. People buy them by the case.

What words or phrases are you dying to see me explain? Let me know, and you just may see your word in my words next week.

*Be advised that I know less Polish than just about everyone. Please do not use my lessons to actually speak Polish.